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What's Wrong with Disaster Recovery?

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Synopsis

King Canute of England once took his throne to shoreline, sat down and commanded the tide to stop advancing. Trying to stop data growth is a similar lesson in futility. The world has now reached more than 4.4 ZB and there is no stopping it for the foreseeable future.

Rather than trying to prevent the inevitable, a better Disaster Recovery (DR) strategy is to ensure data is fully protected. Unfortunately, this is where most companies’ DR strategies are insufficient to safeguard the enterprise from the rising tide of data growth. One serious outage or natural disaster can be enough to threaten the continued existence of the organization. So what’s wrong with DR? Here are the top seven things…

ONE: LACK OF AUTOMATION

Even in those organizations where automation is supposed to be taken care of, you typically find that someone still has to spend time managing or working with backups to take care of the many issues that crop up. To combat these problems, scripting, troubleshooting and repeated backups become a way of life. Bottom line: manual processes put the organization at risk.

TWO: THE USE OF TAPE

The first step is admitting it, you’re still using tape. Now just stop! It’s too inefficient and too slow for the rapid pace of day to day IT. It has no place in a modern DR infrastructure.

THREE: REDUNDANT DATA

It’s one thing to battle data volumes that are rising at 20% to 50% per year but why compound the problem by permitting redundancy within the backup data set? You have to get that under control.

FOUR: NETWORK BOTTLENECKS

Cloud-only backup and DR sounds good. But consider the the simple matter of physics: If the pipe can only manage 100 Mb/sec or 1 Gb/sec and the company needs to recover 100 TB, long delays are unavoidable. It could be many days before the recovery process completes. Today’s enterprise can’t afford to waste days or weeks waiting for its data to arrive—you’ll be out of a job before the Recovery is complete.

FIVE: UNVIRTUALIZED STORAGE

Around 70% of servers are now virtualized and the number continues to grow at a rapid pace. However, storage has lagged behind, creating data siloes that are difficult to manage. This is bad enough for day to day operations. But once a serious data loss event takes place, the DR nightmares begin. Instead of recovering everything at one time, IT has to slowly and laboriously bring up one system and one database at a time.

SIX: ALL ROADS LEAD TO IT

In too many companies, every single data loss incident requires a call to IT, like when the boss accidentally deletes or loses an important file. The situation has become more pronounced in light of the rise of mobility, virtual workplaces and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies. Such a mode of operation is outdated and highly inefficient.